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Results for search "Safety: Child".

02 Mar

Is Your Purse A Danger Zone To Kids?

5 common products parents carry that can potentially harm children.

03 Jun

Liquid Laundry Detergent Packets Remain a Hazard

Children under the age of 6 still face poison risk from laundry detergent packets.

Health News Results - 155

Hunkering down during the coronavirus pandemic has stressed families and raised the risk for child abuse, Penn State researchers report.

"We're very worried about children becoming more seriously injured over longer periods of time before they can get treatment," said Dr. Lori Frasier, chief of the division of child abuse pediatrics at Penn State Children's Hospital.

Data f...

As parts of the United States begin to reopen, two big questions loom for parents -- how quickly can kids get back to school and can it be done safely?

Many factors need to be considered and worked out in partnership with local health departments before individual school districts can open again, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

In newly released guid...

If you have kids and carpets, it might be time to redecorate. Older carpets are a major source of kids' exposure to harmful chemicals known as PFAS, researchers say.

PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are associated with serious health risks in kids and adults, including impaired neurodevelopment, immune system dysfunction, hormone disruption and cancer.

The chemical...

Fear of exposure to COVID-19 appears to be exacting an unexpected toll on public health: Childhood vaccination rates have plummeted, leaving millions at risk for other life-threatening illnesses.

"We're seeing a general drop in pediatrician visits of 70% to 80% -- and that's very concerning," said Dr. Sara Goza, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). She added ...

Some companies are selling hand sanitizers with unproven claims that they'll protect you from the new coronavirus, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Last week, the agency issued its first warning letter for a hand sanitizer marketed with unproven COVID-19-related claims that violated federal law.

The letter was issued to Prefense LLC for making misleading statemen...

The coronavirus pandemic has triggered a wave of accidental poisonings from household cleaners and disinfectants.

With the National Poison Data System recently reporting a more than 20% spike in such emergencies, the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) emphasized the need to store cleaning products safely away from children.

Bleach and alcohol-based hand sanitizers accoun...

Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox) are highly effective and do not cause autism, say researchers who reviewed 138 studies that included 23 million children.

"In terms of safety, we know from previous studies all around the world that the risks posed by these diseases far outweigh those of the vaccines administered to prevent them," said lead author Dr. Car...

Children of parents with mental illness are at increased risk for injuries, researchers report.

Risk is highest before 1 year of age, but remains elevated to age 17, according to the new study.

"Our results show there is a need for increased support to parents with mental illness, especially during the first year of life," said Alicia Nevriana. She is one of the study autho...

Newborns with COVID-19 may get by with only mild infection symptoms, a small, new study suggests.

Researchers at Wuhan University in China identified four newborns with the COVID-19 coronavirus. All were born to mothers with COVID-19 and delivered by cesarean section. Three were separated from their mothers at birth.

None of the babies developed serious symptoms or required ...

It's a tough task, but parents need to keep kids away from playgrounds, shared toys and sports equipment during the coronavirus pandemic, experts emphasize.

The coronavirus can stick around on surfaces for a long time, a recent New England Journal of Medicine study found.

It takes 72 hours for the virus to become undetectable on plastic, according to the study, about ...

At least 1 in 7 U.S. health care workers have to miss work to care for their children if the coronavirus pandemic keeps schools closed -- and their absence could result in more patient deaths, researchers say.

Teams from Yale University and Colorado State University used U.S. Census data to project the child care needs of health care workers.

"Closing schools comes with many...

Nine-month-old Maisie Gillan spent just a few moments crawling around on a neighbor's floor, near the end of a dinner party meant to welcome her family to the community.

The next morning her parents woke to discover Maisie cold and lifeless. Paramedics responded quickly but couldn't revive the baby.

Police later figured out Maisie had accidentally ingested methadone that a r...

Graphic new health warnings must appear on cigarette packages and in cigarette ads beginning next year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says.

As of June 18, 2021, the 11 new warnings must be displayed prominently, filling the top half of cigarette packages on both front and back and at least 20% of the area at the top of ads.

The warnings include text and pho...

For every 52 smokers, secondhand smoke claims the life of one nonsmoker, an international study reports.

"We hope that attributing harm directly to smokers will help influence public opinion against secondhand smoke exposure and enthuse governments to enforce stringent anti-tobacco control," said co-author Dr. Jagat Narula in a Mount Sinai news release. He is a professor of medicine a...

Many American parents haven't talked with their young children about inappropriate touching, a new poll finds.

Experts recommend starting that discussion during a child's preschool years, but the nationwide poll of more than 1,100 parents of 2- to 9-year-olds found that less than half of parents of preschoolers and only one-quarter of those with elementary school-age children had had ...

Busy moms and dads routinely stuff their purses and bags with every item their family might need for the day. But that creates a minefield of choking and poisoning hazards for babies and toddlers, pediatricians warn.

A purse, backpack or diaper bag can contain a hodgepodge of medications and supplements, cosmetics, hand sanitizers, candy, coins and other items that attract little hand...

Gun deaths in kids younger than 15 are 13% lower in U.S. states with gun-storage laws than in states without these regulations, a new study finds.

Researchers from Boston Children's Hospital conducted a 26-year analysis of states with and without child access prevention (CAP) laws. CAP laws are in place in half of U.S. states. They're designed to protect children from accessing fi...

A key to your baby's asthma risk may be as close as your laundry room.

Canadian research shows that an infant's exposure to household cleaning products in the first few months of life is tied to heightened odds for asthma by age 3.

Babies may be especially vulnerable because they "typically spend 80% to 90% of their time indoors, and are especially vulnerable to chem...

More than a quarter of all opioid overdoses in the United States involve teenagers, and a full fifth of those cases were likely suicide attempts, new research shows.

The findings follow an in-depth analysis of nearly 754,000 American opioid poisoning cases that occurred between 2005 and 2018. All had been reported to the U.S. National Poison Data System. An...

Sledding, skiing and ice skating are big fun in the winter, but can lead to big injuries, too.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reminds parents to take steps to help their kids avoid injury and make sure they're dressed appropriately for the cold weather.

"This is the time of year when we see people return from winter break vacations with knee injuries from skiing, ...

With stories about the new coronavirus outbreak flooding the media, it's easy to get scared. And if you're scared, your kids might be, too -- but they don't have to be.

Honesty and directness are key when talking to your child about this new virus, said Diane Bales, associate professor of human development and family science at the University of Georgia, in Athens.

To reliev...

If you are sometimes less than careful with your prescription medications and have young kids at home, a new study shows how easily tragedies can occur.

Researchers found that young children getting into medicines leads to about 400,000 poison center calls and 50,000 emergency department visits in the United States each year.

In more than half of these cases, medications hav...

Play-Doh and uncooked pasta are classic classroom craft supplies -- but what if the kids in the classroom have celiac disease?

Gluten in these substances is not dangerous, new research finds. As long as kids with celiac disease don't eat what they're playing with, we can strike Play-Doh and raw pasta from the exposure risk list, the researchers said.

Other school supplies li...

While health problems from childhood exposure to lead and mercury are on the decline, these and other toxic chemicals continue to take a toll, a new study reports.

The progress likely owes to decades of restrictions on use of heavy metals. But researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine in New York City said that exposure to other toxic chemicals -- especially flame retardants ...

Four in 10 gun owners have at least one gun at home that isn't locked up, even if there are children in the home, a new survey suggests.

To come to that conclusion, researchers questioned nearly 3,000 people while they waited for a free gun storage device (lockbox or trigger lock) at public gun safety events in 10 cities in Washington state between 2015 and 2018.

While many ...

Wildfires are becoming increasingly common, and along with the rising environmental damage, a new study finds more breathing problems for kids.

In December 2017, a small wildfire in San Diego County, Calif., resulted in 16 more kids a day than usual showing up in emergency departments with trouble breathing, respiratory distress, wheezing or asthma.

Before it was over, the...

"Secret shoppers" calling California drugstores to find out how to dispose of unneeded antibiotics and opioid painkillers were given bogus information more than half the time, a new study finds.

Even fewer stores provided correct information if the callers, who were pretending to be parents, called on weekends, the researchers discovered.

"The Food and Drug Administration [F...

If new research is any indication, tougher vaccine exemption laws work.

After California eliminated nonmedical exemptions from vaccinations in 2016, the number of children receiving recommended immunizations rose -- especially in counties where "vaccine hesitancy" runs high, a new analysis found.

The policy -- passed in response to outbreaks of measles and other "old" childh...

Efforts to reduce choking deaths among young children seem to have paid off: A new report finds the number of kids dying from choking on household objects has plummeted 75% since 1968.

Regulations, more education about choking hazards and guidelines from organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics have likely all played a role in the downward trend, said study author...

The American Medical Association (AMA) is calling for a ban on all e-cigarettes and vaping products not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help people quit smoking tobacco cigarettes.

The move is in response to a sharp rise in youth e-cigarette use and an outbreak of more than 2,000 illnesses and 40-plus deaths caused by vaping-related lung illness.

"The r...

Outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases are on the across rise in the United States, often fueled by "anti-vaxxer" parents reluctant to immunize their kids.

However, states are countering these trends with laws to boost childhood vaccination rates and safeguard children, a new study finds.

"Vaccines are our best public health tool for controlling many childhood diseases," ...

Squeezing the last drops of blood from the umbilical cord has been touted to help preterm babies get more of the nutrients they need, but it may be dangerous, a new study finds.

When umbilical cord blood is forced into the baby's abdomen, the pressure can cause tiny blood vessels in the brain to rupture. This is especially dangerous for the most preterm infants, the researchers said...

The HPV vaccine gives parents a chance to prevent their children from developing some types of cancer, and two new studies reaffirm what past research has found -- the vaccine is safe.

The two studies included millions of doses of Gardasil 9 vaccine, the only vaccine currently used in the United States for the prevention of HPV-related cancers.

"The data from our study was...

When parents can no longer get "personal-belief" exemptions from childhood vaccinations, they may get around it by asking for religious exemptions for their kids, a new study finds.

Researchers found that after Vermont banned personal-belief exemptions, the number of kindergartners with religious exemptions from vaccination suddenly shot up -- from 0.5% to nearly 4%.

When a 7-year-old's tongue got stuck in a juice bottle, one savvy doctor used an old trick to release it.

The boy was trying to get the last drop of juice when his tongue created a vacuum and he couldn't get it out of the bottle. When he arrived at Auf der Bult Children's Hospital in Hannover, Germany, his tongue was swollen and discolored.

At first doctors tried lubric...

Almost 41 million American children will don costumes and go trick-or-treating tonight, so all parents should remember that not every treat is safe for their kid.

Inspect your children's candy haul for signs of tampering before you let them eat anything, said Bruce Ruck, managing director of the New Jersey Poison Control Center at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School's department of emer...

After a mass shooting, pediatricians are less likely to ask parents about gun safety in the home, a new study finds.

Researchers examined records from more than 16,500 routine visits to the University of Utah's pediatric clinic between January 2017 and July 2018. One question parents are typically asked at these appointments is whether there are guns in the home and whether they're lo...

Lawn mowers are always a hazard around children, but a new study suggests that kids in rural areas are at the highest risk.

Each year, more than 9,000 children in the United States are treated in emergency departments for lawn mower-related injuries.

"Despite efforts within the health community to highlight how easily children can be injured by lawn mowers, we still see thou...

Children should be at least 12 years old before they're left home alone for four hours or more, a majority of U.S. social workers surveyed say.

Also, social workers are more likely to consider it neglect if a child is injured while home alone.

The email survey asked 485 members of the National Association of Social Workers to consider different scenarios in which children of...

Many U.S. parents are not heeding recommendations on how to put their babies to sleep safely, a new government study finds.

Most babies are being placed on their backs to sleep -- one of the key ways to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the study found.

But relatively few parents are following some other recommendations: Less than one-third said they o...

Drinks marketed to children often contain loads of unhealthy sugars and sweeteners, and they come in packages that deliver too-large servings, a new report finds.

None of 34 sweetened drinks aimed at the youth market meet nutrition recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), according to University of Connecticut researchers.

"Sweetened drinks are about two-...

Think the chances that your kid could be hit by a train are slim to none?

New research suggests you should think again.

Issued to coincide with "Rail Safety Week," the Sept. 23 report finds that, on average, a child dies of a train-related injury somewhere in the United States every five days. And for every death, another three children are injured.

The finding ind...

Video games that guarantee heart-stopping action might come dangerously close to fulfilling that promise in some players.

A handful of video gamers have passed out when intense sessions caused their heartbeat to lapse into an irregular rhythm known as an arrhythmia, researchers report.

Three boys between the ages of 10 and 15 separately lost consciousness when the action in ...

As doctors race to determine what is causing sudden and severe lung illnesses among some vapers, new research discovers dangerously high levels of a known carcinogen in menthol-flavored electronic cigarettes.

The chemical (pulegone) is used as a menthol and mint flavoring, even though it was recently banned in foods, the researchers said.

"If pulegone is not allowed in food,...

Many children walk through parking lots without adult supervision, putting them in great danger, a new study warns.

Researchers watched 124 kids, ages 2 to 10, and their adult companions as they crossed a parking lot at a community recreation center.

The team found that 67% of the children lacked adult supervision at some point during the walk and nearly 90% were bey...

More than 8 in 10 U.S. adults say kids should be required to get vaccinated in order to attend school, but far fewer trust the safety of vaccines, a new poll finds.

The nationwide poll from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health sampled 1,550 adults (704 parents and 846 others) and found 84% support rules requiring schoolkids to be vaccinated against diseases such as measle...

Only about one in five U.S. adults and one in 10 children and teens who suffered head and neck injuries in cycling crashes said they wore a helmet, a new study finds.

An analysis of data from more than 76,000 cyclists nationwide who experienced such injuries between 2002 and 2012 found that only 21% of men, 28% of women and 12% of younger riders had been wearing a helmet.<...

There are gaps in immunity against mumps among college-aged Americans who were vaccinated in childhood, researchers say.

New findings show the need to learn more about the immune system response to mumps and mumps vaccination.

Mumps is a highly contagious viral disease that can spread rapidly among people in close living quarters, such as college students and sports teams. I...

Trying to calm a cranky baby can be stressful for parents, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has an important caution about what not to do.

Don't place baby in a so-called "sleep positioner," "nest" or "anti-roll" device, because of the suffocation risk. Babies have died after rolling from side to tummy and being unable to breathe. While some of these devices had been cleared...

When your child is sick, taking the right medication can make all the difference -- as long as it's correctly chosen and measured. But sometimes mistakes occur. Here are safety steps to help prevent medication errors from happening.

Make sure that the prescribing doctor knows about any drugs, vitamins and supplements your child takes, and about any allergies he or she might have. Conf...

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