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Results for search "Death &, Dying: Misc.".

12 Aug

Dangers of Football Conditioning

"Irrationally intense" conditioning sessions may be causing more football fatalities, study finds

Health News Results - 237

In a harrowing harbinger of what might come in places like New York City, a new report out of Italy shows the death rate for hospitalized COVID-19 patients continues to grow almost 40 days after the country's first case was reported.

Italy has passed China for coronavirus cases, reporting close to 106,000 cases and nearly 12,500 deaths, a Johns Hopkins tally showed Wednesday morning. ...

Heart disease deaths spike with extreme heat, and rising temperatures due to climate change may lead to a surge in such deaths in hot regions, researchers say.

For the study, the investigators analyzed 2010 to 2016 data on more than 15,000 heart-related deaths among people aged 15 and older in Kuwait, which has an average temperature of 82.2 degrees Fahrenheit (F).

Compared ...

Once infected with the new coronavirus, a 20-something has about a 1% chance of illness so severe it requires hospitalization, and that risk rises to more than 8% for people in their 50s and to nearly 19% for people over 80, a comprehensive new analysis finds.

On the other hand, the death rate from COVID-19 is significantly lower than that seen in prior estimates, the new ...

There's been a sharp increase in high blood pressure-related deaths in the United States, particularly in rural areas, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 10 million U.S. deaths between 2007 and 2017 and found that death rates linked to high blood pressure (hypertension) rose 72% in rural areas and 20% in urban areas.

The increase was highest in ...

A new study on the evolving coronavirus crisis brings good news: A death rate that's much lower than prior estimates.

The report out of China now sets the overall death rate in symptomatic cases from COVID-19 disease at 1.4% -- much lower than the 3.4% death rate supplied earlier in the pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO).

That puts the COVID-19 death rat...

For every 52 smokers, secondhand smoke claims the life of one nonsmoker, an international study reports.

"We hope that attributing harm directly to smokers will help influence public opinion against secondhand smoke exposure and enthuse governments to enforce stringent anti-tobacco control," said co-author Dr. Jagat Narula in a Mount Sinai news release. He is a professor of medicine a...

If you wind up in the hospital with coronavirus, what might raise your chances of dying from the disease?

A new study offers some answers: being older; showing signs of sepsis; and having blood-clotting issues. To come to that conclusion, researchers analyzed 191 adult patients with confirmed COVID-19 at two hospitals in Wuhan, China, the city where the worldwide outbreak began.

...

People whose spouse or partner has died are less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma, but more likely to die from it, a new study says.

An analysis of data from population-based studies conducted in the United Kingdom and Denmark between 1997 and 2017 found that people who had lost a spouse or partner were 12% less likely to be diagnosed with melanoma than others.

But b...

Walking on America's streets is getting ever more dangerous, a new report shows.

Based on data from the first six months of 2019, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) predicts there were 6,590 pedestrian deaths that year, which would be a 5% increase over the 6,227 pedestrian deaths in 2018.

The 2019 figure is the highest number of such deaths in more than 30 ...

U.S. life expectancy hasn't kept up with other wealthy nations and experts have cited health care, drug addiction and mental health woes as possible causes.

But maybe the key to longevity can be found in the classroom, new research suggests.

In the new study, a team from Yale and the University of Alabama-Birmingham sought to tease out the impact of race and education on l...

Americans are drinking themselves to death at ever-increasing rates, with women in particular hitting the bottle hard, a new study shows.

The rate of alcohol-induced deaths among women increased between 3.1% and 3.6% a year from 2000 to 2016, while deaths among men increased 1.4% to 1.8% each year, according to the findings.

What's worse, the rates have accel...

Daily exposure to ground level ozone increases city residents' risk of early death, researchers warn.

Ground level ozone -- commonly found in cities and suburbs -- forms when pollutants react in sunlight.

New study findings suggest that thousands of ozone-related deaths "could be potentially reduced under stricter air quality standards," according to study co-author Ana Vice...

Survivors of the 2001 terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center who developed PTSD have a lasting risk of premature death, a new study finds.

The study of nearly 64,000 emergency responders and civilians found that the longer the post-traumatic stress disorder lingered, the more likely they were to die early from any cause.

Over 13 years of follow-up, more than...

The dangers of "distracted driving" are well-known, but texting while walking may also be a road hazard, a new research review finds.

Pedestrians who are busy texting are less likely to look both ways before crossing the street and have caused a growing number of "close calls" with cars, the review found. And while chatting on a cellphone or listening to music can be distracting, neit...

More than two-thirds of Americans don't know that heart disease is the leading cause of death among U.S. women, a new survey reveals.

Overall, 68% of respondents weren't aware that heart disease is the top killer of women, but the rate was much higher (80%) among millennials.

A large number of respondents mistakenly believed breast cancer is the main cause of death i...

Older women with colon or rectal cancer are more likely to die early if they lack support from family, friends or others, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers looked at more than 1,400 postmenopausal women with colon or rectal cancer who were enrolled in the long-term U.S. Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study.

Compared to those with strong social support, those wit...

All it takes is short-term exposure to fine-particle air pollution from cars and bushfires to increase the risk of cardiac arrest, a new study warns.

The findings underscore the need for tighter worldwide limits on so-called PM2.5 air pollution and development of cleaner energy sources, according to the authors.

"As no boundary exists in air quality among countries, a global...

Young Americans who live in urban areas or live with low income or low education levels are more likely to die if they get colon cancer, a new study finds.

"There are a lot of disparities in health care," said lead investigator Dr. Ashley Matusz-Fisher, an internist at the Levine Cancer Institute in Charlotte, N.C. "It is important to look at the sociodemographic disparities so that w...

How bad or how long this year's flu season will be remains to be seen. But one thing is already clear: It's proving to be an especially lethal season for infected children.

Fueled by a strain of influenza that children may be especially vulnerable to, less than two months into flu season 39 children have already died, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Pre...

"Food insecurity" -- not having enough money to afford sufficient food -- increases the risk of premature death, new research suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 510,000 adults in Canada between 2005 and 2017. Over the study period, nearly 25,500 people died prematurely. The average life expectancy in Canada between 2008 and 2014 was 82, so deaths at or b...

Sepsis kills more than twice as many people worldwide as once believed, and children in poor regions account for an excessive number of such deaths, researchers say.

Sepsis is an out-of-control immune response to infection that harms organs. People who survive sepsis can have lifelong disabilities.

In 2017, there were 48.9 million cases of sepsis and 11 million sepsis deaths...

Drugs may kill twice as many Americans as government records suggest, a new study claims.

In 2016, the reported rate of drug-related deaths among 15- to 64-year-olds was 9% -- compared with about 4% several years earlier -- with 63,000 deaths classified as drug-related.

However, the new study concluded that the actual number of drug-related deaths could have been abo...

A condition called lymphopenia -- low levels of lymphocyte blood cells -- could be an early warning for illness, a new study suggests.

Danish researchers linked the condition to a 60% increased risk of death from any cause during the study period.

A low lymphocyte count was also associated with a 1.5- to 2.8-fold increased risk of death from cancer, heart disease, respir...

Drowning death rates at public beaches, lakes and rivers are three to four times lower in states with tighter rules for swimming in such locations, a new U.S. study finds.

Researchers analyzed U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data to focus on the 20 states with the highest rates and the 10 states with the lowest rates of drowning deaths among people over age 5. Open wat...

Kids in poor countries are up to 200 times more likely to die after surgery than kids in rich nations, a new study finds.

As the need for pediatric surgery grows in poor and moderate-income countries, it leaves 2 billion children without access to safe surgery and anesthesia, said researcher Dr. Mark Newton. He's a pediatric anesthesiologist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital a...

In a finding that suggests most opioid overdose deaths are accidental, new research shows suicide is associated with far fewer of these deaths than thought.

"Our findings suggest that the current emphasis on the contribution of suicide to opioid-related deaths may be overstated, and that for most individuals who overdose on opioids, the primary clinical focus should be on substance us...

Many U.S. women with breast cancer ultimately die of other causes, a new study finds, highlighting the need for survivors and their doctors to pay attention to overall health.

In recent decades, advances in breast cancer treatment have meant that more women are becoming long-term survivors, which also means that other health issues will become important in their lives.

In th...

Most folks would prefer a peaceful death at home, in familiar surroundings with the company of their loved ones.

Now, for the first time in a century, there's a rise in the likelihood of those dying wishes to be honored.

Home has now surpassed the hospital as the most common place of death in the United States, for the first time since the early 20th century, according to a ...

New research suggests that a baby's age may offer clues to sudden unexplained infant death (SUID) -- formerly known as SIDS.

The study identified two unique groups of babies who died from SUID -- one who died within a week of birth, and another who died later on.

"SUID is a term that encompasses SIDS, unknown causes of death and accidental suffocation in bed." explained st...

Efforts to reduce choking deaths among young children seem to have paid off: A new report finds the number of kids dying from choking on household objects has plummeted 75% since 1968.

Regulations, more education about choking hazards and guidelines from organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics have likely all played a role in the downward trend, said study author...

Your odds of surviving a cardiac arrest long enough to be admitted to the hospital are lower on the weekend than on a weekday, researchers say.

For the study, the investigators analyzed data from nearly 3,000 patients worldwide who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were treated with a publicly accessible automated external defibrillator (AED).

Overall, 27% o...

As Americans pay tribute to all veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces Monday, new research suggests that how comrades died can affect levels of grief among soldiers who served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

"Our goal was to better understand how combat veterans experience the deaths of their military comrades in battle or by suicide, and what factors predict the nature and leve...

Rural Americans die more often from potentially preventable causes than their urban counterparts, a new government study shows.

These causes include cancer, heart disease, injury, respiratory disease and stroke, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention research.

Between 2010 and 2017, rural counties saw a widening disparity in preventable deaths from c...

Even a little running on a regular basis can extend your life, Australian researchers say.

They analyzed 14 studies that included more than 232,000 people whose health was tracked for between 5.5 and 35 years. During the study periods, nearly 26,000 participants died.

The collective data showed that any amount of running was associated with a 30% lower risk of death from...

Heart failure deaths are reaching epidemic proportions among America's seniors, a new study finds.

About one in eight deaths from heart disease are from heart failure, and nine out of 10 are among those over 65 years of age, researchers report.

"We are now in the midst of a 'silver tsunami' of heart disease and heart failure," said senior study author Dr. Jamal Rana, chief o...

Nearly a third of U.S. heart patients die at home, which is more than the number who die in the hospital, according to a new study.

Researchers examined data on more than 12 million heart disease patients who died between 2003 and 2017. They looked at whether the deaths occurred in a hospital, home, nursing or long-term care facility, inpatient hospice, or elsewhere (outpatient medica...

The anger and fear seething throughout the United States could be having a fatal impact on some of the nation's youngest citizens.

More teens and young adults are coming to a violent end in recent years, either at their own hand or another's, new federal data show.

Both suicide and homicide death rates are rising among 10- to 24-year-olds, according to the U.S. Centers for D...

Adults who pack on pounds between their mid-20s and middle age have an increased risk of premature death -- and the same is true of those who lose weight from middle to late adulthood, according to a new study.

The findings suggest that maintaining normal weight throughout adulthood reduces the risk of early death, the China-based researchers said.

They analyzed data from mo...

If you have chronic kidney disease, taking opioids for pain may increase your odds of hospitalization or early death, a new study suggests.

The risks were particularly elevated at the highest opioid doses, the researchers said.

"We found that receipt of prescription opioids was associated with a higher risk of death and hospitalization compared with other pain medications, p...

A sunny outlook on life may do more than make you smile: New research suggests it could also guard against heart attacks, strokes and early death.

In the review of 15 studies that collectively involved almost 230,000 men and women, the findings were remarkably consistent, the study authors added.

"We found that optimists had a 35% lower risk for the most serious complica...

If you have type 2 diabetes, keeping your blood sugar levels stable over time may be key to living longer.

New research finds that people who have more swings in their blood sugar levels were more than twice as likely to die early, compared to folks with more stable blood sugar management.

The study authors used a test called hemoglobin A1C to measure blood sugar. This com...

As government funding dried up and many women's health clinics across America closed, cervical cancer screening rates fell and deaths from the disease rose, a new report shows.

Nearly 100 women's health clinics in the United States closed between 2010 and 2013, researchers said -- often due to the passage of more restrictive laws or the loss of Title X government funding.

In...

Over the past four decades, the U.S. has seen a sharp rise in the number of pregnant women with high blood pressure, new research reveals.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from about 151 million hospitalizations between 1970 and 2010 to determine the rates of chronic high blood pressure in pregnant women aged 15 to 49.

Chronic high blood pressure was defined as ...

A new study helps confirm a dismal reality: Poor Americans are more likely to die from heart failure than their richer counterparts.

The likely reasons? According to the researchers, higher obesity rates and associated increases in type 2 diabetes appear to be driving two-thirds of the trend.

"This study underscores the disparities in health care faced by many Americans," Dr...

Folks with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have a much lower risk of death if they take cholesterol-lowering statins as directed by their doctor, a new study reports.

About 200 million people worldwide suffer from PAD, a condition in which arteries feeding blood to the legs become clogged, researchers explained.

However, patients who took their prescribed statins had a 20% r...

For people who are obese and have type 2 diabetes, weight-loss surgery leads to more than a slimmer figure.

It also reduces the risk of heart complications and premature death by about 40% compared to standard medical care, new research says.

The Cleveland Clinic researchers compared the impact of various types of weight-loss (bariatric) surgery to usual medical care for ...

Heart disease still claims the lives of more people globally, but in more affluent nations it has now ceded its place as the leading killer to cancer, a major new report finds.

Around the world, 40% of all deaths are caused by heart disease, making it the number one global killer. That means that of the estimated 55 million people who died around the world in 2017, approximately 1...

Many Americans who die waiting for a kidney transplant actually had donor organs offered to them multiple times -- but their transplant center declined them.

That's the finding of a new study of over 280,000 U.S. patients who were on kidney transplant waitlists between 2008 and 2015.

It may come as a surprise to anyone who's assumed that when patients languish on waitlists, ...

The good news is overdose deaths from opioids in the United States have dropped slightly in 25 states, but here's the bad news: Deaths from fentanyl are still increasing, federal health officials reported Thursday.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), overdose deaths from fentanyl increased, especially when mixed with other opioids, benzodiazepines, ...

Everyone has done it: breezing through a red light at the last minute. But a new report shows that deaths caused by drivers taking that chance are on the rise in the United States.

There were 939 people killed in red light running crashes in 2017, a 10-year high and a 28% increase since 2012, according to AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety researchers.

"Drivers who decide...

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