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Results for search "Diabetes: Type I".

Health News Results - 55

Ten percent of COVID-19 patients with diabetes die within a week of entering the hospital and 20% need a ventilator to breathe by that point, a new French study found.

Researchers analyzed data on more than 1,300 COVID-19 patients with diabetes, average age 70, who were hospitalized in France during March. Of those, 89% had type 2 diabetes, 3% had type 1, and the rest had...

An Australian study has good news for people with type 2 diabetes -- fewer people with diabetes are having heart attacks and strokes compared to 20 years ago.

Heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular complications have declined in the general population, too. But the decreases among people with diabetes have outpaced those for the general population, the researchers said.

...

If you or someone you love has diabetes, you've probably noticed that diabetes always pops up on lists of people at higher risk from COVID-19 infections. And you've probably wondered why.

The good news is that people with diabetes -- any type -- don't seem to have a greater risk of catching the virus. The bad news is if you do get it and you have diabetes, you have higher odds of hav...

If you or your child has type 1 diabetes, you already have a lot of extra health worries, and now you need to add COVID-19 infections to the list.

You may be wondering if you have a higher risk of catching COVID-19, if you'll be able to get your diabetes supplies and how you might handle the illness if you do get sick.

Here's some information to...

Type 1 diabetes is a challenging, time-intensive disease that often strikes children, and new research suggests that strong family support helps improve the well-being of young adults with the condition.

The study found that young adults (under 30) with type 1 diabetes were more likely to be "flourishing" if they had good family connections. Flourishing was defined in the study as h...

Maybe you've gone to Craigslist to find a used car or a secondhand couch, but imagine having to turn to the internet to pay for lifesaving drugs.

It's already happening: A new study found that hundreds of ads were placed on Craigslist for insulin and asthma inhalers during a 12-day period in June 2019.

"This study shines a light on how deeply some patients are struggling to...

Diabetes among U.S. youths continued to rise from 2002 to 2015, especially for Asian children and teens, a new study says.

Researchers analyzed type 1 and type 2 diabetes among 5- to 19-year-olds. They found rates were generally higher in blacks and Hispanics than in whites. Surprisingly, the rate in Asian/Pacific Islanders rose faster than in all other racial ethnic groups.

A new artificial pancreas system, drugs that help control blood sugar and protect the heart and the kidneys, a new medication that delays type 1 diabetes, and a new way to track blood sugar throughout the day -- 2019 was a pretty big year in diabetes care.

"This has been a good year for patients who have diabetes. There have been a lot of changes and...

Living with diabetes -- especially if you need insulin to survive -- is a never-ending job that can be life-threatening if done wrong. That constant daily stress can lead to "diabetes burnout," a new study says.

Diabetics experiencing burnout are mentally and physically exhausted, feeling detached from their condition and apathetic about their need for self-care. Diabetes burnout can...

Skyrocketing prices and insurance limits are driving many people with diabetes to seek medications and supplies from an underground supply chain, a new study found.

"The cost of insulin, which is required in type 1 diabetes and a subset of type 2 diabetes, has increased substantially over the last decade. As the price of insulin rises and insurance premiums and deductibles go up, too...

People with inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes or blood clots may be at increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis -- and people with rheumatoid arthritis are at added risk for heart disease, blood clots and sleep apnea, researchers say.

Their findings could improve understanding of how rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops and also lead to earlier detection and screening for other...

While the high price of insulin has gotten a lot of attention lately, it's not the only cost issue facing people with diabetes. New technologies designed to improve blood sugar management often cost too much for people to afford.

Maya Headley, 36, has had type 1 diabetes for 30 years. The New York City resident had been using an insulin pump to deliver the repeated daily insulin do...

Parents of babies with type 1 diabetes have to prick their child's skin multiple times a day to check their blood sugar. But researchers may have developed a much easier way to check -- a sugar-sensing pacifier.

While baby sucks on the pacifier, it collects saliva, tests the sugar (glucose) levels and wirelessly sends results to a receiver that a parent/caregiver can see.

...

The latest version of the so-called artificial pancreas system helped people with type 1 diabetes gain even better control of their blood sugar levels than current technology does, a new study reports.

The device combines an insulin pump, a continuous glucose monitor and a computer algorithm. The system measures blood sugar levels and delivers insulin automatically when levels rise. ...

Hurricanes can harm anyone in their path, but new research suggests that seniors with diabetes face a 40% increased risk of dying within the first month after a storm hits.

It's not just the first month they have to worry about: The study also found seniors with diabetes still had a 6% higher risk of dying even up to 10 years later.

"We compared seniors with diabete...

Many people with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin at least once a day, but new animal research suggests a pill may one day do the trick.

This experimental pill can withstand the trip through the gastrointestinal tract, scientists report. When it gets to the small intestine, it breaks down into dissolving microneedles that attach to the intestinal wall and release the dr...

Are elderly people with diabetes being overtreated?

A new study suggests that's so: Older, sicker patients tend to be the ones most likely to still be using insulin to manage their blood sugar, despite guidelines that suggest it's often safer to lower diabetes treatment intensity with age.

The study found that nearly 20% of people with type 2 diabetes older than 75 were...

Young and middle-aged adults with low vitamin D levels may live shorter lives, a large study suggests.

The findings come from a 20-year follow-up of more than 78,000 Austrian adults. Researchers found that those with low vitamin D levels in their blood were nearly three times more likely to die during the study period than those with adequate levels.

When it came to the caus...

Chinese researchers may deserve a toast for their new findings that suggest light to moderate drinking may be beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes.

The review found that people who had a bit of alcohol daily had lower levels of a type of blood fat called triglycerides. But alcohol didn't seem to lower blood sugar levels in people who already had type 2 diabetes, the review found...

U.S. adults with diabetes are no more likely to meet disease control targets than they were in 2005, a new study finds.

Typically, diabetes treatment focuses on controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, as well as not smoking.

For the study, Massachusetts General Hospital researchers analyzed data on diabetes care in the United States from 2005 through ...

Diabetes brings with it a variety of long-term complications, but at least one of those -- heart failure -- is a bigger threat to women than men, new research suggests.

The risk difference was even more pronounced for women with type 1 diabetes.

"Our global review of 12 million people shows that having diabetes increases the risk of heart failure in both women and men. Howe...

When he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 1939, Don Ray was just 4 years old. Doctors told his parents he'd likely live well into his teens.

By the time he hit his teens, the management of type 1 diabetes had progressed far enough that a doctor predicted he might live well into his 30s. Yet another doctor improved on that prognosis and said he'd probably make it to 50.

...

Vaccinating against the common infant infection rotavirus not only cuts a child's odds of getting sick, it might also prevent them from developing type 1 diabetes later in life, new research suggests.

Infants who got all of the recommended doses of the "stomach flu" virus vaccine had a 33% lower risk of developing type 1 diabetes compared with unvaccinated babies, according to a s...

Children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at an early age have slowed growth in brain areas linked to mild cognitive deficits, new research suggests.

The study compared MRIs of the brain in kids with type 1 diabetes to age-matched children without the condition. Researchers also saw that areas of slower brain growth were associated with higher average blood sugar levels.

"We ...

A two-year delay in the onset of type 1 diabetes could make a big difference for people with the disease. And researchers say a new drug may make that postponement possible.

Researchers gave the drug teplizumab or a placebo to a small group of people who were nearly certain to develop type 1 diabetes, based on genetics and certain symptoms. Those given a placebo, or dummy drug, progre...

It's a simple concept, but new research reinforces the idea: Teens with type 1 diabetes benefit when they feel their concerns have been heard.

Teens with type 1 diabetes may experience anger, frustration and anxiety if they haven't met their treatment goals. Their parents and health care providers may also feel frustrated and may blame the teen. But the new study suggests that interv...

There is no one right diet for people with diabetes, and patients should instead have personalized nutrition plans, a new American Diabetes Association (ADA) report says.

There simply is no ideal percentage of calories from carbohydrates, proteins and fats. And combinations of different foods or food groups are acceptable for the management of diabetes and pre-diabetes, the report add...

For many Americans, the cost of lifesaving insulin is simply too high, leading as many as one in four to ration the drug, experts testifying before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce said this week.

The meeting focused primarily on defining the problem and exploring potential solutions, such as lowering the list prices of insulin and increasing transparency so that anyone can ...

When you have type 1 diabetes, keeping track of your blood sugar levels can be challenging. But new research suggests that seniors might really have trouble avoiding low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia.

In fact, many patients over age 60 may experience up to 100 minutes of a day with low blood sugar and not even know it, the study researchers said.

The bottom line: "Older adult...

A commonly used diabetes test may not spot the disease as well as an older test does, a new study suggests.

The researchers said the newer test -- called hemoglobin A1C -- didn't catch three-quarters of the diabetes diagnoses found by the older test -- called an oral glucose tolerance test.

"Diabetes is a global epidemic. Since the incorporation of A1C [as a test for diagno...

When Giuseppina Miller's 8-year-old son, Peter, was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, he necessarily got a lot of his parents' attention.

"We tried to adjust pretty well, but I was getting no sleep because I had to check his blood sugar in the middle of the night, and I was worried all the time. My two younger daughters felt the stress and ended up getting ignored a little bit," M...

Wherever Kathleen Simmonds goes, her service dog, Emma, isn't far behind. Emma -- also known by her Instagram handle, "Type 1 Wonder Dog" -- has been trained to sniff out dangerously high and low blood sugar levels and alert Simmonds so she can take action.

Simmonds, 48, has had type 1 diabetes for more than three decades, but she reached a point where she was no longer able to feel...

Poor blood sugar control puts people with type 1 diabetes at increased risk for fragility fractures, a new study shows.

A fragility fracture is a broken bone caused by a fall from standing height or less.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 3,300 people with type 1 diabetes and more than 44,000 with type 2 diabetes, in the United Kingdom.

The da...

People with diabetes often don't have enough insulin-producing beta cells to control their blood sugar, but a combination of two novel drugs may coax the body into making more of these vital cells, an early study finds.

Together, the drugs caused beta cells to reproduce at a rate of about 5 percent to 8 percent a day, according to the researchers. Work has only been done in the lab a...

Fasting before a cholesterol blood test is just a nuisance for most people, but for those with diabetes, it can be dangerous.

New research shows that up to 22 percent of people with diabetes who fasted for lab tests had a low blood sugar episode (hypoglycemia) while waiting for the test. The researchers also found that only about one-third of those who had a low blood sugar episode h...

More than one-quarter of people with diabetes have skimped on needed insulin because of the drug's soaring price tag, according to a new small study.

Surveying nearly 200 Americans with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, researchers found 26 percent had underused insulin because of cost.

But insulin isn't a drug you can safely ration, doctors warn.

"For people with type ...

People with type 1 diabetes who use marijuana may double their risk of developing a life-threatening complication, a new study suggests.

Called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), the condition occurs when there is not enough insulin to break down sugar in the body, so the body burns fat for fuel instead. This triggers a build-up of chemicals known as ketones, which make blood more acidic a...

If you have diabetes, you need all recommended vaccinations, the American Association of Diabetes Educators says.

Diabetes reduces the immune system's ability to fight certain infections. This raises the risk for serious complications from diseases that vaccines protect against -- including flu, pneumonia, hepatitis B, tetanus and shingles.

"People with diabetes may be at hi...

It's not always easy -- even for doctors -- to tell if someone has type 1 or type 2 diabetes when they're diagnosed as an adult.

And a new study finds mistakes are common.

That's what happened to British Prime Minister Theresa May when she was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2012. She was in her 50s at the time. Despite having all of the symptoms common to type 1 diabetes...

The number of Americans with diabetes who wind up in hospitals with serious infections, or who develop them while in the hospital, is on the rise.

Between 2010 and 2015, the number of diabetics hospitalized for infections rose 52 percent (from 16 per 1,000 people to 24 per 1,000), according to researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preven...

The risk of death from dangerously low blood sugar is much higher among seniors who have both diabetes and dementia than those with diabetes alone, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 20,000 people aged 65 and older with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who were followed for up to five years after their first recorded low blood sugar episode.

Those with both di...

If a pregnant woman eats a lot of high-gluten foods, the odds that her child will have type 1 diabetes rise significantly, new research suggests.

In the study, pregnant women who had the highest consumption of gluten had double the risk of having a child with type 1 diabetes compared to those who ate the least gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley.

Howe...

1 in 7 Americans has diabetes, and many don't even know they have the blood sugar disease, a new report shows.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 14 percent of U.S adults have diabetes -- 10 percent know it and more than 4 percent are undiagnosed.

"Diabetes remains a chronic health problem in this country, affecting some 30 million people," sa...

People with type 1 diabetes have a much greater risk of serious heart problems and early death, especially if they were diagnosed before age 10, new research suggests.

But the study only found an association, and didn't prove cause and effect.

More than 27,000 type 1 diabetics in Sweden were followed for an average of 10 years. The patients were compared with a control grou...

People with diabetes face a host of expenses related to their disease, but some relief may now be available in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility as part of the Affordable Care Act.

A new study reports that the number of prescriptions filled rose by up to 40 percent for insulin and other diabetes medications in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility in 2014 and 2015.

...

Gaps in private insurance coverage are common among American adults with type 1 diabetes, raising their risk for health crises, a new study finds.

"Type 1 diabetes requires intensive daily management in order to simply remain alive, so interruptions to care and coverage of insulin and supplies can pose a major risk," said study leader Mary Rogers. She's a research associate professor ...

Human insulin is as safe and effective as newer, more expensive insulin analog drugs for people with type 2 diabetes, researchers report.

The new study included people with type 2 diabetes who were followed for an average of 1.7 years after they started using insulin.

"We found that for patients with type 2 diabetes in usual practice, the use of the more expensive insulin an...

Weight loss might help reverse progression of a common heart arrhythmia in obese adults, a new study shows.

Researchers found that when obese adults with atrial fibrillation (a-fib) shed at least 10 percent of their starting weight, most saw the course of their condition reverse. More than half became a-fib-free during the study period.

Experts said the findings underscore t...

For many diabetics, one of the most dreaded aspects of managing their condition is the need to inject insulin multiple times a day. But Harvard researchers have discovered a way to deliver insulin in a pill, and it appears to work well -- at least in rats.

A lot of questions remain: What is the proper dose compared to injected insulin? Will it be delivered uniformly? And, the biggest...

Pregnant women who have any form of diabetes may face higher odds that their child could develop autism, a new study suggests.

Whether it's type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes, which specifically affects pregnant women, having the blood sugar disease might be linked to an increased autism risk, the researchers said.

"The risk appears to be highest in type 1, then type 2 a...