New hours for Campbell's Pharmacy:
Monday - Friday 9am to 5pm. Saturday 9am-2pm and Sunday 9am-1pm.
Prescriptions are available for delivery and curbside pickup.
Campbell's Pharmacy Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Doctors".

Health News Results - 168

Most people around the world say they would continue to work if they had flu-like symptoms, an online survey finds.

In the face of the coronavirus pandemic, researchers called the findings disturbing.

The survey -- conducted online between October 2018 and January 2019, before the emergence of COVID-19 -- included responses from 533 workers in 49 countries. Respondents inclu...

The coronavirus pandemic has led many older adults to postpone medical care, a new survey finds.

The University of Chicago survey found that 55% of U.S. adults aged 70 and older experienced a disruption in their medical care during the first month of social distancing.

Thirty-nine percent put off non-essential care and 32% delayed primary or preventive care since s...

Dr. Rachel M. Bond has seen the difference black cardiologists can make.

She recalls the time she volunteered to give a brief talk at a predominantly black church in Brooklyn, New York. Many of the members, she said, had untreated heart problems - because they'd felt physicians didn't understand them or take them seriously.

"After that meeting, you would be surprised how m...

Many health care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic are struggling with sleep, a new study finds.

The researchers also found that those with insomnia were more likely to have depression, anxiety and stress-based trauma.

The study included nearly 1,600 health care workers who completed an online questionnaire between January 29 and February 3 at the peak o...

Doctors and nurses are trained to deal with life-and-death situations, to be calm in the face of crisis. But whether it's in hard-hit New York or places where COVID-19 has yet to surge, medical workers say the pandemic is straining their mental health like nothing before.

"The stress is probably 100 times what you could have imagined it was in the past," said Judy Davidson, a nurse s...

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to already high stress levels in emergency rooms, a social psychologist says.

"ER providers are on the front line of this pandemic, and stress, anxiety and anger are increasing," said Linda Isbell, a professor of psychology at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

"As we all face anxiety about the fallout of this pandemic, anger about a healt...

Many surgeons have neck and back pain after performing operations, a small new study finds.

It included 53 surgeons (34 men and 19 women) who did 116 operations at the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix. They wore devices that measured neck, back and arm posture during surgery, and were asked about pain and fatigue levels before and after.

Pain increased after surgery in every body area...

A new study casts doubt on claims that artificial intelligence (AI) equals or surpasses the ability of human experts to interpret medical images.

Many previous studies were of poor quality and may have exaggerated the benefits of AI, which could pose a risk to the safety of millions of patients, the study authors claimed.

The investigators reviewed two randomized clinical tr...

The day paramedics rushed Jeramiah Parsons to the hospital, his lips were so sore and swollen he had trouble talking. A skin-picking habit related to his methamphetamine addiction had permitted a dangerous antibiotic-resistant infection to take up residence in his face. He had no health insurance and no doctor he could call.

"It's difficult to acquire a primary care physician, especia...

Even in the midst of rising rates of suicide and substance abuse, nearly 117 million Americans live in what is known as "health professional shortage areas."

Put another way, only 27% of mental health needs in those areas are being met, according to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). More than 6,300 additional providers would be needed to erase the gap.

...

As U.S. states and cities scramble to contain the new coronavirus by restricting public gatherings, hospitals are increasingly using remote medical care to battle the outbreak.

On Tuesday, Medicare administrator Seema Verma announced at a White House press briefing that the agency would greatly expand its coverage for telemedicine nationwide, the Associated Press reported.

...

In the majestic Blue Ridge mountains of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, large percentages of rural residents struggle with poverty and limited access to health care.

In Avery County, N.C., you'll find only one primary care physician for every 2,920 residents, according to the 2019 County Health Rankings, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and University ...

TUESDAY, March 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Dr. Jennifer Cobanov had been tracking her young thyroid patient for years. The girl's antibody levels were elevated, but her thyroid functioned normally. Then, routine blood work revealed something quite unusual: Her underactive thyroid had suddenly switched into overdrive.

Last November, the California pediatrician referred the 13-year-ol...

If you ask Dr. Molly Benedum whether there is a shortage of doctors in America, this is the story she will tell you:

After joining the Appalachian Regional Health System's family practice in North Carolina, she saw an immediate influx of patients -- women in particular -- that reflected both pent-up demand for primary care doctors and the fact that she happened to be the only woman am...

Many U.S. primary care doctors worry they aren't ready to care for the growing ranks of Americans with Alzheimer's disease, a new report suggests.

In a Alzheimer's Association survey, half of primary care doctors said the U.S. medical profession is unprepared for the coming surge in Alzheimer's cases.

Right now, it's estimated that more than 5 million Americans age 65 and ol...

Heart attack survivors receive a laundry list of tasks from their doctors as they leave the hospital, all aimed at improving their heart health.

It would be understandable to look at the list with a raised eyebrow and ask just how important all of it is.

Vitally important, it turns out.

Heart patients who follow all of their doctor's recommendations have a much low...

If your doctors keep giving you prescriptions for antibiotics, you might be at increased risk of hospitalization for a serious infection, a new report suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from 2 million patients in England and Wales. These patients had received prescriptions for antibiotics between 2000 and 2016 to treat common infections such as upper respiratory tract,...

Race, gender and sexual orientation are tied to mistreatment of medical school students by faculty, physicians and fellow students, according to a new report.

For the study, Yale University researchers analyzed more than 27,500 surveys of students at 140 accredited medical schools in the United States.

The researchers found that women, Asians, under-represented minorities, a...

Rave online reviews about a hospital stay may not mean much about the actual medical care there, if a new study is any indication.

Researchers found that across U.S. hospitals, patient-satisfaction scores were more dependent on "hospitality" factors -- like friendly nurses, quiet rooms and good food -- than on hard measures of health care quality.

Americans don't seem to care about the race or sex of emergency room doctors, a new study shows.

Participants were asked to rate their satisfaction with a simulated ER visit and the scores were the same whether their doctor was white or black, or a man or a woman.

"We were really surprised that even after looking at these data in many different ways, we did not see evidence...

American doctors prescribe more brand-name medications after they get a free lunch or other incentives from drug company marketers, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed drug prescribing between 2013 and 2015 for a large sample of enrollees in Medicare Part D. The federal program, which subsidizes prescriptions for 37 million seniors and disabled people, accounts for nearly one-thir...

Too few teenage boys at risk for HIV infection are tested for the AIDS-causing virus in the United States, researchers say.

And this contributes to the growing epidemic of undiagnosed HIV in the nation.

Close to 15% of HIV infections in the United States are undiagnosed, but the undiagnosed rate is more than 3.5 times higher (51%) among 13- to 24-year-olds, accordin...

Nearly half of antibiotic prescriptions for Medicaid patients appear to be inappropriate, new research suggests.

That kind of overprescribing raises risks for everyone, experts say, as bacteria gain more chances to mutate around the life-saving drugs.

For the study, researchers analyzed 298 million antibiotic prescriptions filled by 53 million Medicaid patients between 2004 ...

American dentists often prescribe more than the recommended supply of opioid painkillers to patients, a new study finds.

Not only that, they are more likely to prescribe more powerful opioids, the researchers found.

In this study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 550,000 dental visits by adult patients between 2011 and 2015, before U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

Little Johnny's cough has lasted for days, leaving Mom and Dad wondering if the symptoms warrant a trip to the doctor. A new study suggests that such parents may choose to skip that standard pediatric sick visit.

Overall visits to the pediatrician in the United States dropped by 14% between 2008 and 2016. Sick visits were down 24%.

At the same time, well-child visi...

Could a simple computer hack help make a dent in the opioid epidemic?

New research suggests that the number of painkillers prescribed to patients can be reduced just by lowering default computer settings that display a preset number of pills.

That simple change led doctors at two California hospitals to prescribe fewer opioids, and the approach could improve opioid prescribi...

Regardless of their family's insurance status, many children get medical care they don't need, a new study suggests.

One in 11 publicly insured and 1 in 9 privately insured children in the United States were given what the researchers called unnecessary, "low-value" care in 2014, the researchers report.

"While we found that publicly insured children were a little more likel...

The crisis of opioid abuse continues in the United States. However, a new study finds there still aren't enough doctors authorized to prescribe the leading drug treatment for opioid addiction.

This shortfall occurs even though the number of physicians approved for the drug, called buprenorphine, has risen dramatically over the past decade, researchers say.

Right now, fewer ...

Many American teen girls and young women under the age of 21 are undergoing pelvic exams and Pap tests they just don't need, a new study finds.

"Parents of adolescents and young women should be aware that cervical cancer screening is not recommended routinely in this age group," said study senior researcher Dr. George Sawaya. He is professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductiv...

Most older Americans don't fully rely on or trust online ratings of doctors, a new study finds.

Among men and women between the ages of 50 and 80, only 43% have looked online to see how patients rated a doctor, researchers report.

Of these, two-thirds chose a doctor because of good online ratings and reviews, according to the National Poll on Healthy Aging, conducted b...

If your child is obese, new research suggests that those extra pounds can alter the results of routine blood tests.

"We performed the first comprehensive analysis of the effect of obesity on routine blood tests in a large community population of children and found that almost 70% of the blood tests studied were affected," said study first author Victoria Higgins, from the Hospital...

The number of Americans who have a primary care doctor is shrinking -- with potential consequences for their health, researchers say.

Their new study found that in 2015, an estimated 75% of Americans had a primary care provider -- down from 77% in 2002. The declines were most pronounced among people under 60: For Americans in their 30s, for example, the figure dropped from 71&...

The days of old-fashioned house calls may be over, but there is a growing trend toward providing some hospital care in the comfort of patients' homes. Now, a new study suggests it might end up being cheaper and, in some respects, better than traditional hospital care.

The study, done at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, tested a "hospital at home" program -- where patients with ...

When your doctor prescribes an antibiotic, there's a 43% chance it may not be needed, a new study finds.

"While there has been a lot of research looking at inappropriate prescribing, our findings suggest that we still may be underestimating the proportion of prescriptions that are inappropriate," said lead study author Michael Ray, a researcher at Oregon State University College ...

American seniors living in rural areas face a higher risk of hospitalization and death, and a lack of medical specialists may be the reason why, researchers report.

"People on Medicare with chronic conditions such as heart failure or diabetes who live in rural areas have higher death and hospitalization rates than their urban peers," said study leader Kenton Johnston. He's an assistan...

If you have a neurological disorder, a video chat with your doctor might be as good as an office visit for checking on your condition.

That's the conclusion of researchers who analyzed 101 studies on telemedicine use for concussion, traumatic brain injury, dementia, epilepsy, headache, multiple sclerosis, movement disorders, neuromuscular conditions and general neurology.

In...

Many patients who have an artery-opening procedure don't understand or remember information they receive before their surgery, and most have unrealistic expectations about what it will do for them, a new study finds.

Researchers examined the effectiveness of informed consent -- which is meant to provide the risks and benefits of a procedure -- given to a group of patients before they ...

The American Medical Association (AMA) is calling for a ban on all e-cigarettes and vaping products not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help people quit smoking tobacco cigarettes.

The move is in response to a sharp rise in youth e-cigarette use and an outbreak of more than 2,000 illnesses and 40-plus deaths caused by vaping-related lung illness.

"The r...

How much pain you feel when blood samples are taken could depend on how nice the person wielding the needle is, new research suggests.

Patients were 390% more likely to say their pain was well-controlled when the person taking their blood was courteous, according to a study presented recently at the Anesthesiology annual meeting, in Orlando.

"It's not surprising that a c...

The extra care that black women's hairstyles can require is often a barrier to exercise, but many U.S. health care providers aren't even aware of the problem, a new study finds.

Researchers surveyed doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants in the department of family medicine at Ohio State University, and found that 95% of them sometimes/often discuss exercise with bl...

Despite a growing need for mental health care for children and teens -- including a rise in youth suicide -- many areas of the United States lack any child psychiatrists, new research reports.

The study found that almost three-quarters of American counties don't have a single child psychiatrist.

"There are about 17 million children in the United States with a mental health...

Language barriers between doctors and patients may translate into return visits to the hospital for certain heart or lung conditions, a new study suggests.

Conducted at two urban hospitals in Canada, the study found the heightened risks among patients with limited English skills who were suffering from either heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) -- which inclu...

Melanoma is the most lethal type of skin cancer, and a new study finds that the diagnosis of a suspect lesion gains accuracy when a specialist pathologist is brought on board.

Many patients with melanoma are first diagnosed by general practitioners, dermatologists or plastic surgeons. A biopsy sample of the suspect lesion might then be sent to a general pathologist for further diagnos...

Among hospitalized patients, infections with the fungus Candida are common and deadly.

In the United States, 25,000 cases occur each year, and nearly 45% of infected patients die. But a new study reports that the death rate can be cut by 20% if an infectious disease specialist takes charge of such cases.

These specialists are more likely to follow evidence-bas...

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is in the news a lot, and now newer research has prompted a leading pediatricians' group to update its guidelines for diagnosing and treating the disorder for the first time since 2011.

Dr. Mark Wolraich, lead author of the guidelines, noted that there weren't any dramatic differences between these and previous guidelines. But, he said,...

A leading group of U.S. doctors has broadened its guidelines on birth control, recommending that all forms of hormonal contraceptives, including vaginal rings and contraceptive patches, be sold over the counter.

In addition, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) said DMPA (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) injections should also be available over the counter,...

As terrified as you might be of a possible cancer diagnosis from your doctor, a new study warns that you still need to keep your appointment.

Why? Patients who blow off appointments for cancer symptoms are 12% more likely to die within a year of diagnosis, British researchers report.

Those most likely to skip appointments are men under 30 or over 85, people living in poo...

As the day wears on and doctors are rushed and tired, they are more likely to prescribe opioid painkillers, a new study finds.

Interestingly, they weren't more likely to prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin, or physical therapy, the researchers said.

"These findings support the widespread perception among providers that time pressure to provide a 'quic...

Despite calls for more diversity among doctors in the United States, a new study shows that minorities remain underrepresented in medical schools.

Researchers found that between 2002 and 2017, the actual number of minority students in medical schools increased, but the rate of increase was slower than that of age-matched members of those minorities in the U.S. population.

By...

Amid an epidemic of opioid painkiller addiction, Americans are still being overprescribed narcotic painkillers compared to many other countries, researchers report.

A case in point is Sweden, where patients are less likely to be prescribed opioids after surgery than American patients. In fact, in the United States and Canada combined, surgical patients are seven times more likely to g...