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Results for search "Safety &, Public Health: Misc.".

15 May

Laws Banning Texting and Driving Save Teenage Lives

Distracted driving laws can help decrease fatal motor vehicle crashes involving teens.

07 Jun

How Many Microplastic Particles Do We Really Consume?

Men, women and children may be consuming tens of thousands of microplastic particles each year.

Health News Results - 461

Air pollution might increase the risk for multiple sclerosis (MS), Italian researchers report.

They found that in places with low levels of tiny particles of air pollution called particulate matter, the risk for MS was lower than in areas where those levels were high. In urban areas, the risk was 29% higher than in rural areas.

"Our findings show that the prevalence of...

Face coverings may reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19, a new study suggests.

Researchers assessed the effectiveness of seven types of face coverings -- including medical-grade and homemade masks -- when people breathed or coughed while standing or lying down. They were also tested using a dummy attached to a cough-simulating machine.

All face coverings without an outle...

Without quick action, the new coronavirus could sicken up to a quarter-billion people in Africa during the pandemic's first year and claim 190,000 lives, a new modeling forecast suggests.

Up to 5.5 million people could require hospitalization, 140,000 could have severe COVID-19, and 89,000 would be critically ill, the World Health Organization study says.

The forecast -- l...

More than one-fifth of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in New York City have critical illness, and nearly 80% of critically ill patients need ventilators to help them breathe, according to a new study.

The findings have important implications for U.S. hospitals, specifically the need to prepare for large numbers of COVID-19 patients who require intensive care, the researchers said....

Jails and prisons are hotbeds for the spread of COVID-19, endangering both the inmates held within as well as the wider community, public health experts warn.

The highly infectious virus easily passes from person to person, and prison conditions -- overcrowding with poor ventilation and shared living quarters -- make it even more likely that a COVID-19 outbreak can occur, said Dr. Aly...

Statewide stay-at-home orders appear to help slow the spread of COVID-19 above and beyond other steps like banning large gatherings and closing non-essential businesses.

That's the suggestion from a new cross-border study.

Certain counties in Iowa -- one of five states that didn't issue a stay-at-home order for its citizens -- experienced a 30% greater increase in COVID-...

In a finding that illustrates how distracted driving laws are saving lives, researchers report that car crash deaths among teens plunged by one-third during a period when the number of U.S. states with such laws on the books tripled.

"We found that states which had primary enforced distracted driving laws had lower fatal crashes involving 16- to 19-year-old drivers and passengers," sa...

Virginia resident John Imbur doesn't plan to sit down for a meal in a diner anytime soon, even if his state reopens for business after its stay-at-home order lifts on June 10.

"I don't feel comfortable going into places where there are going to be a group of people, particularly if they're unmasked," said Imbur, 50, a tech support worker in Blacksburg. "With a restaurant, no one's goi...

More than one-quarter of popular English-language COVID-19 information videos posted to YouTube are misleading, researchers warn.

There are posts, for example, falsely claiming that drug companies already have a cure for COVID-19, but won't sell it, and that different countries have stronger strains of coronavirus, a new study finds.

YouTube viewers "should be skeptical, us...

Groups that spread vaccine misinformation on social media have more impact than government health agencies and other expert organizations on undecided people, a new study finds.

The spread of false information could have significant public health consequences if an effective COVID-19 vaccine is developed, the researchers noted.

For the study, investigators developed an innov...

COVID-19 has at least temporarily shut down more than half of cancer research, according to an American Cancer Society (ACS) survey.

The survey, conducted in early April, was completed by close to 500 cancer researchers who have received ACS funding. It revealed that:

  • 54% were working from home.
  • 32% were working both at home and in their lab.
  • ...

As coronavirus pandemic restrictions are lifted, many Americans will face physical and mental health challenges -- including fear and anxiety -- as they return to work.

"Uncertainty and unpredictability can really create an unhealthy amount of fear and stress, especially when it's sustained over such a long period of time," said Dr. K. Luan Phan, head of psychiatry and behavioral heal...

Until now, cities such as New York, Seattle, Los Angeles and New Orleans have been hot spots for COVID-19 outbreaks in the United States.

But the coronavirus threat is growing in America's rural areas -- and in many ways, the risk there is even more dire than it has been in big cities, experts say.

That's because people tend to be older and sicker in rural areas, and have fa...

Need counseling about the care of bone or joint issues?

During the coronavirus pandemic, it may be available on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' (AAOS) website. Its OrthoInfo.org blog includes tips for treating bone and joint pain while sheltering in place, as well as a look the pandemic's implications for postponed surgery.

"To say that the COVID-19 pandemic ha...

As pandemic-related restrictions ease and people return to parks and other outdoor spaces, remember to protect yourself against another threat -- ticks.

"With our latest mild winter, ticks have been active in much of the region on warmer days all winter long," said Jody Gangloff-Kaufmann, an entomologist at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., who said it's too soon to predict populati...

The first COVID-19 test using saliva samples that patients collect at home has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The emergency use authorization was issued to Rutgers Clinical Genomics Laboratory for the diagnostic test using home-collected samples. Patients return their sample to the New Jersey-based lab in a sealed package for analysis.

The screening...

Researchers have predicted that if climate change goes unabated, the planet will experience intolerable heat in several decades. But a new study has found that in certain global hot spots, it's already happening.

In recent years, certain regions -- including the Persian Gulf, Indian subcontinent and some Mexican locales -- have recorded off-the-charts combinations of heat and humidity...

Some elective surgeries that were postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic have since been rescheduled. But is it safe to have that knee replacement or cataract removal now?

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) offers a checklist to help you make that determination.

"Physicians, hospitals and health systems are eager to resume elective surgeries, and patients are...

Dangerously hot days for crop pickers in the United States will double over the next three decades because of climate change, a new study warns.

"Studies of climate change and agriculture have traditionally focused on crop yield projections, especially staple crops like corn and wheat," lead author Michelle Tigchelaar, a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University who conducted the...

People all over the globe who've recovered from the new coronavirus want to know the same thing: Am I immune, at least for a while? A new study of common coronaviruses is not exactly reassuring.

Researchers found it was "not uncommon" for people with run-of-the-mill coronaviruses (not the one that causes COVID-19) to have a repeat infection within a year. Of 86 New York City residents...

When concerns about catching the coronavirus encourage people to stay physically distant, that's healthy. When those fears drive ailing people away from hospitals, though, it could be dangerous.

To such people, doctors say: Your emergency room is safe. And if you need to go, you should.

Hospitals are updating safety procedures in lots of ways, said Dr. Patricia Best, an interven...

Many U.S. states are preparing to emerge from their quarantine cocoons, hoping to get their economies back on track.

But experts are concerned that these states have not yet created the public health infrastructure needed to safely reopen without causing a second wave of COVID-19 infections.

In particular, tens of thousands of new public health workers trained in contact tra...

The coronavirus pandemic shouldn't stop people with heart problems from seeking medical care, experts say.

"Either call your doctor or come to the emergency department. Don't take chances with heart disease," said Dr. Sam Torbati, co-director of the emergency department at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

"We are very concerned that fears over COVID-19 is resulti...

It's good for you to take a run during the coronavirus pandemic -- and safe if you take precautions, an expert says.

"It's good to get outside, get moving and get some sanity back in such a crazy time," said Grace Neurohr, a physical therapist and running specialist at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore.

Running "can provide some structure to your day and build a routine that can h...

The coronavirus pandemic has led many older adults to postpone medical care, a new survey finds.

The University of Chicago survey found that 55% of U.S. adults aged 70 and older experienced a disruption in their medical care during the first month of social distancing.

Thirty-nine percent put off non-essential care and 32% delayed primary or preventive care since s...

If you have kids and carpets, it might be time to redecorate. Older carpets are a major source of kids' exposure to harmful chemicals known as PFAS, researchers say.

PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are associated with serious health risks in kids and adults, including impaired neurodevelopment, immune system dysfunction, hormone disruption and cancer.

The chemical...

Fear of exposure to COVID-19 appears to be exacting an unexpected toll on public health: Childhood vaccination rates have plummeted, leaving millions at risk for other life-threatening illnesses.

"We're seeing a general drop in pediatrician visits of 70% to 80% -- and that's very concerning," said Dr. Sara Goza, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). She added ...

Supplies of personal protective equipment remain scarce across the United States, especially the N95 respirator masks that health care workers use to protect themselves from the new coronavirus.

To help extend the useful life of available equipment, researchers and hospitals are turning to a long-known, if little-used, means of disinfection -- ultraviolet radiation.

"It's ge...

More green spaces in cities could significantly reduce premature deaths and their costs, researchers say.

Focusing on Philadelphia, they concluded that increasing the city's tree canopy by about one-third -- from 20% to 30% of land area -- could prevent more than 400 premature deaths a year and save nearly $4 billion in related economic costs.

Increases of 5% and...

Governors preparing to relax social distancing orders and reopen their economies are about to make a dire mistake that could cause COVID-19 cases to surge in their states, infectious disease experts warn.

The United States' ability to contain future COVID-19 outbreaks rests on its ability to test hundreds of thousands daily for the virus, and the country is nowhere near that capacity,...

The coronavirus pandemic has triggered a wave of accidental poisonings from household cleaners and disinfectants.

With the National Poison Data System recently reporting a more than 20% spike in such emergencies, the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) emphasized the need to store cleaning products safely away from children.

Bleach and alcohol-based hand sanitizers accoun...

Without the luxury of sheltering at home, essential workers are experiencing unprecedented levels of stress and anxiety, according to mental health experts.

"We're in the battlefield," said Paul DiCarlo, co-owner of Jimmy's Food Store, a small Italian grocery in Dallas. "You're just trying to get the customers in and out quickly."

Nearly half of all American adults say the COVID...

If most Americans get COVID-19, the cost of their care could top $650 billion, a new study finds.

To reach that estimate, researchers created computer models that simulated various scenarios.

Each model dealt with patients who developed different symptoms over time and were seen at clinics or in an emergency room. The simulations considered the treatment they would need a...

Next time you inspect your salad greens to make sure they look clean, consider this: Researchers are trying to determine if drying leafy greens using the spin cycle of a retrofitted washing machine is safe.

Some farmers use the method instead of expensive, commercial-grade spinners to dry leafy greens after they're washed. But it's not clear using a converted washing machine is safe.<...

Contact lens users may be at increased risk for coronavirus infection, so they need to be extra careful, an eye expert says.

"There are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 transmission by handling of contact lenses," said David Chu, assistant professor of ophthalmology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, in Newark. "However, since contact lenses can cause eye irritation, wearers tend to ...

Sparse traffic on U.S. roads during the coronavirus pandemic has spawned a spike in speeding and other types of reckless driving, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) says.

Here are some examples.

Police in Colorado, Indiana, Nebraska and Utah have clocked drivers going more than 100 miles per hour on highways.

In Los Angeles, cars are going as much as ...

For most people, being appointed U.S. surgeon general would qualify as a career-defining moment. But for Dr. Regina Benjamin, the real defining moment came earlier, in the bayous of Alabama.

A native of Daphne, Alabama, Benjamin began her medical career at a nonprofit clinic in the small shrimping village named Bayou La Batre. Her clinic there had already been damaged by two hurricanes ...

Women under age 65 with coronary artery disease are more likely to die if they live in rural areas of the United States, and premature deaths among them have surged, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed nationwide data on premature deaths from coronary artery disease between 1999 and 2017. While premature deaths decreased overall, they remained consistently higher in rural areas --...

There's a lot of confusion about medications and COVID-19, so experts offer some answers.

There are no proven drug treatments for the illness caused by the new coronavirus, so doctors sometimes use drugs approved for other conditions to treat seriously ill COVID-19 patients. This is called off-label use.

One drug being investigated as a possible COVID-19 treatment is hydroxy...

In the brave new world of COVID-19, home is your sanctuary, the one place you want to be sure is virus-free.

But if you have to head outdoors, what are the best practices for decontaminating your things when you return home? Does everything -- smartphones, wallets, money and keys -- need to be washed down with hot water and soap?

"We are all swimming through an invisible swa...

The lifesaving benefits of strict social distancing rules during the coronavirus pandemic far outweigh their projected harm to the U.S. economy, a new report claims.

"Our benefit-cost analysis shows that the extensive social distancing measures being adopted in the U.S. likely do not constitute an overreaction," said lead author Linda Thunstrom, an assistant professor of economics at ...

The virus struck swiftly, stoking panic, fear and mistrust as it sickened millions and killed thousands -- and now, more than a century later, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic offers lasting lessons for a world in the grip of COVID-19.

"The questions they asked then are the questions being asked now," said Christopher Nichols, an associate professor of history at Oregon State University...

Dr. Tom Moore argued forcefully in favor of the stay-at-home order that has helped limit the spread of COVID-19 cases in Wichita, Kan.

Moore appeared before the Sedgwick County Commission on March 24 to testify the order was necessary, and the order went out the very next day.

"Literally the very next day, we started to see more cases pop up," said Moore, director of infecti...

Despite increased demand for inhalers in some parts of the United States, Americans with asthma shouldn't ration their medications during the coronavirus pandemic, the American Lung Association says.

Rescue inhalers are in short supply in some areas because hospitals are giving albuterol to COVID-19 patients with severe symptoms to help them breathe, the group explained. Albuterol is ...

Guidelines for the prioritization and treatment of breast cancer patients during the coronavirus pandemic have been released by a group of U.S. medical organizations.

"As hospital resources and staff become limited, it is vital to define which breast cancer patients require urgent care and which can have delayed or alternative treatment without changing survival or risking exposure to...

Weeks after e-cigarette giant Juul voluntarily stopped selling many flavored vaping products popular with U.S. teens, sales rebounded as customers switched to varieties still on the shelves.

In fact, sales eventually surpassed previous records, according to new American Cancer Society (ACS) research.

"When companies are able to make these decisions for themselves, they are...

Researchers say they've developed a low-cost swab test that can diagnose COVID-19 infections in about 45 minutes.

The CRISPR-based test -- which uses gene-targeting technology and requires no specialized equipment -- could help relieve testing backlogs in the United States as COVID-19 continues to spread, the scientists said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not app...

THURSDAY, April 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- With protective gear in short supply, Duke University researchers say they've designed a much-needed respirator for health care workers battling COVID-19.

The respirator was created by a medical and engineering team at the university and is being used by Duke Health doctors treating patients with suspected cases of COVID-19.

The ...

Americans who are young, liberal and heavy consumers of news are most likely to follow COVID-19 safety recommendations, a new online survey reveals.

Three-quarters of the 1,000 U.S. respondents said they followed a majority of recommended social distancing behaviors such as keeping 6 feet apart and limiting trips to stores, the University of Delaware researchers said.

Slight...

Stay-at-home orders and other social distancing measures have kept people from going out in four key U.S. cities, likely blunting the spread of COVID-19, federal health officials report.

The number of people leaving their homes fell gradually but persistently as officials closed schools, restaurants and bars in New York City, New Orleans, San Francisco and Seattle, according to a stud...

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